State Attorney General Pam Bondi stressed the importance of global collaboration to end sexual slavery during opening remarks at Florida’s Human Trafficking Summit Monday in Orlando.

“If we don’t tackle this worldwide, we’ll never solve the problem,” Bondi said. “This is a transnational crime and a worldwide problem.”

Bondi spoke to an audience of more than 500 attendees that included law enforcement, service providers, human trafficking survivors, health care professionals, educators, legislators and community leaders during the summit at the Rosen Centre Hotel.

The summit began with Bondi asking for a moment of silence for the victims of the shooting massacre in Las Vegas.

“We’ve already reached out, my office, our victims’ advocates … to Nevada already, to offer our services, our advocates,” she said. “I know many of you have large organizations, if you want to reach out with your assistance, I know that would be greatly appreciated in Nevada right now, because we sadly know how to deal with rapid response after Pulse nightclub.”

Bondi urged corporations, businesses, hospitals and schools to train their employees and students about how to recognize human trafficking. She pointed to an Uber driver that noticed in his rearview mirror that an older man and young girl did not look right. His call to law enforcement ended a human trafficking ring, she said. Uber is now training its 40,000 drivers on the signs of sexual coercion and abuse.

Hollywood has glamorized prostitution and kidnapping in movies like “Taken,” Bondi said.

“Unfortunately, the father doesn’t come in and save the child at the end of the day,” she said. “Your child can be sitting at the dinner table every night and be a victim of human trafficking.”

The state attorney said community leaders are committed to making Florida a zero-tolerance state for human trafficking. She said the practice is directly related to opioid addiction and that’s how traffickers get children and teens hooked into slavery. Florida is working with officials in Mexico and Africa to help come up with solutions to both drug and human trafficking, she added.

Opportunities for collaboration during breakout sessions at the daylong summit will allow Florida to continue working to protect victims, prevent trafficking and prosecute traffickers.

Academy award-winning actress Anne Archer also spoke Monday. The “Fatal Attraction” star founded Artists for Human Rights in 2006 to encourage filmmakers to create content on human rights abuses.

“There’s an estimated 21 to 46 million slaves worldwide and the slave trade generates $19 billion — more than Nike, Google and Starbucks earnings combined,” Archer said. “Gangs and organized crime run human trafficking rings because selling people is easier and safer than running guns and drugs and the penalties are less severe. It’s a low-risk, high-reward market. If we stop the buyers, the whole predatory industry collapses.”

Archer said the typical portrayal of sex by Hollywood implies the sex industry is empowering for young women.

“The reality is far darker than the images you see on screen,” Archer said. “Teenagers and children are being bought and sold online like a used bike or iPhone.”

Bondi named Seminole County Assistant State Sttorney Lisa Haba Prosecutor of the Year for her work in the office’s sex crimes and child abuse division, prosecuting cases involving human trafficking and crimes against children. Last year, Haba successfully prosecuted the first human trafficking case in Seminole County. She also sits on the board of directors of The Lifeboat Project, a human trafficking nonprofit. Haba is a member of the Seminole County Human Trafficking Task Force and teaches the community, law enforcement officers and deputies about human trafficking.

Along with the attorney general’s office, the summit is also sponsored by the Statewide Council on Human Trafficking, the Florida Department of Juvenile Justice, the Florida Department of Children and Families and the University of Central Florida.

About The Author

The youngest of seven children, Terry O. Roen followed two older brothers into journalism. Her career started as a reporter for the Orlando Sentinel, where she wrote stories on city and county government, schools, courts and religion. She has also reported for the Associated Press, where she covered the Casey Anthony and Trayvon Martin trials along with the Pulse massacre. Married to her husband, Hal, they have two children and live in Winter Park. A lifelong tourist in her own state, she writes about Central Florida’s growing tourism industry for Florida Politics and Orlando Rising.

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